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EBOLA Fast Facts Flyer

EBOLA FAST FACTS FLYER

WHAT IS EBOLA?

 • Ebola is also known as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) or Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF). There are five Ebola subspecies, four of which are known to cause the disease.

 • Ebola was first identified in 1976 near the Ebola River in the country now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

  • All suspected cases of viral hemorrhagic fever viruses must be reported immediately to the Alabama Department of Public Health.

WHAT IS MY RISK OF GETTING EBOLA?

  • People at highest risk of contracting Ebola include those who travel to countries with active Ebola outbreaks and are:

 - Healthcare workers

 - Family and friends of an Ebola patient that were in direct contact with the person who was infected with  the virus.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF EBOLA?

  • If you have traveled to countries with active Ebola outbreaks within the last 3 weeks, and develop symptoms that include fever (greater than 101.5°F) and any of the following:

 - Severe headache

- Muscle pain

- Weakness

- Diarrhea

- Vomiting

 - Abdominal (stomach) pain

 - Lack of appetite

 - Unusual bleeding

  • Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to a person with Ebola, although 8-10 days is most common.

HOW DOES EBOLA SPREAD?

  • Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) by:

 - Person-to-person: Ill person's body fluids (blood, urine, saliva, feces, vomit, and semen)

- Surface-to-person: objects (such as needles) contaminated with infected body fluids

- Animal-to-person: Contact with infected animals in Africa (wild animals hunted for meat or bats)

  • Ebola cannot be spread by air, water, or food.

                                                               HOW DO I STOP THE SPREAD?

  • Don't travel to countries where the disease is active, wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices.
  • If you must travel to an area with known Ebola cases, do the following:

- Practice careful hygiene. Avoid contact with blood and body fluids.

- Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person's blood or body fluids.

- Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.

- Avoid contact with bats, primates, and blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these  animals (bushmeat).

 - Avoid hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated.

 - After you return, monitor your health for 21 days and call your health care provider immediately if you develop symptoms of Ebola. Use the Self Monitor Chart at  www.adph.org/ebola/assets/ADPHSelfMonitorChart.pdf to document monitoring.

 WHAT IS THE TREATMENT FOR EBOLA?

  • There is no vaccine or medicine (e.g., antiviral drug) licensed in U.S.
  • Treat Ebola symptoms as they appear. Used early, supportive care may increase the chances of survival. For example:

- Providing intravenous fluids and balancing electrolytes (body salts)

- Maintaining oxygen status and blood pressure

 - Treating other infections as they occur

WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORMATION?

Go to cdc.gov and type Ebola in SEARCH box.

WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORM

Alabama Department of Public Health Epidemiology Division, 201 Monroe St, Montgomery, AL 36104 800-338-8374   |  www.adph.org/epi

REV. 10.02.14

 

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